SUSHI ROLLER, A GERMAN ROLLING MACHINE TO EASY CREATE MAKI ROLLS

LOOKS GOOD, FEELS EASY, WORKS!

I know that sushi is a traditional Japanese food, but look what a German design firm, osko + deichmann,  has done to bring the process of making sushi into the 21st century. This is a great new application to an established mechanism used to roll tobacco, but it is still clever.

Now anyone can roll sushi, or anything for that matter. I’d love to try to roll a few desserts, or make lasagna rolls, with this! Sushi, being a traditional japanese dish, has been becoming increasingly popular in europe and the united states over the last decade. Recently sushi is being transferred from the restaurant to the home.

More and more people are trying to make their own sushi, despite the fact, that becoming a real sushi-chef takes years of experience, preparing the ingredients for a maki-roll is quite easy. The traditional maki is a rice-roll filled with sliced vegetables (e.g. cucumber) and covered with a sheet of seaweed (nori). Only the rolling itself, with the traditional bamboo-mat,is difficult without practice. often people get frustrated after a few attempts.

The sushiroller solves the problem enabling everybody to make perfectly round, thick maki-rolls.

OLIVETTI VALENTINE TYPEWRITER BY ETTORE SOTTSASS AND PERRY KING

still LOOKS GOOD, use to FEEL portable, WORKS since 1969!

The Olivetti Valentine portable typewriter was designed by Perry King in collaboration with Ettore Sottsass and was in production in 1969. As a typewriter the Valentine was not an outstanding commercial success, however its radical design was recognised as revolutionary (for a typewriter). The Valentine is revered as a 20th century design icon and has been collected and displayed by design museums internationally.

Ettore Sottsass joined the Olivetti product design team in 1958 which at that time included Marcello Nizzoli. Ettore Sottsass was inspired by pop art at the time and this is evident in the design of the Valentine. The bright red ABS plastic case distinguished it from other office equipment of the time. The Valentine was such a radical redesign of an existing product that it immediately caught the attention of design institutions. Ettore Sottsass’ design approach altered radically in the 1980s turning post modern (anti design) and consolidating in the establishment of the Memphis school.

Olivetti was established as an office equipment company in the 1930s. Olivetti’s founder Adriano Olivetti ensured that the company’s manufacturing division team included architects, writers, graphic designers, painters and advertising experts who actively contributed to the process of product design, advertising and graphics. Over the years this philosophy and method has seen the design and production of many products, which demonstrate ingenuity, innovation and style.

CREATOVERSE, AN IPAD APP THAT ALLOWS YOU TO “DRAW” OTHER APPS

LOOKS CLEVER, FEELS GENIUS, WORKS!

Creatorverse, by Linden Lab (the developers of Second Life) is a $5 iPad app that hopes to equalize the great coding divide. It resembles MS Paint, or any simple shape-drawing software you’ve ever used. But rather than ending the experience with a mere print, everything you create can be assigned a simple, interactive function, simulated in a physics engine.

You start with a clean desktop. Tap the circle toggle, then tap the desktop to shape your circle. So far, this is just like any other illustration program. But when you tap on this circle that you made, another panel pops up with all sorts of physical characteristics attached. As easily as painting that circle orange, you can make it bouncy. And what’s a bouncy orange circle? That’s a basketball.

This is the basic workflow behind Creatorverse, and once you find your way around a bit, creating becomes very quick. You can craft portals or tweak an object’s wind resistance, and these functions never get more complex than a few taps.

CARDBOARD DIGITAL CAMERA BY IKEA

LOOKS CHILDISH, FEELS HOMEMADE, apparently WORKS!

Check out this strange looking digital camera made by IKEA out of cardboard. It was included as part of a press kit at an event in Europe recently, and apparently the “disposable” camera might go on sale sometime soon in IKEA stores. It uses two AA batteries and stores up to 40 photographs in the built-in memory. Images can be downloaded to your computer using the USB connection that swings out from one of the corners of the camera.

BLACK RUBY, A COLLECTION OF HOUSEWARES MADE OUT OF RECYCLED TIRE RUBBER

LOOKS GOOD, FEELS ECOLOGIC, WORKS!

Dutch industrial designer Debbie Wijskamp has created a fantastic collection of “Black Ruby” housewares made entirely from recycled tire rubber. Working from her Arnhem studio, this young designer enjoys handcrafting designs that explore new uses for everyday materials.

To make the Black Ruby collection, Debbie Wijskamp developed a technique that recycles widely available rubber powder into waterproof, functional objects. She creates small tire ‘pebbles’ and combines them using a polyurethane binder to create strange-looking cups, plates, bowls and vessels. Weird and wonderful, the Black Ruby collection would make a great topic of conversation at any dinner table.

365 CLOCK BY SIREN ELSIE WILHELMSEN – THE CLOCKS THAT KNITS TIME

365 is stitching the time as it passes by. It is knitting 24 hours a day and one year at the time, showing the physical representation of time as a creative and tangible force. After 365 days the clock has turned the passed year into a 2-m long scarf. Now the past can be carried out in the future and the upcoming year is hiding in a new spool of thread, still unknitted.

HP ENVY ULTRABOOKS AND SLEEKBOOKS

LOOKS GOOD, FEELS GOOD, WORKS!

What’s that? You’re hungry for more HP laptops? Good! Because we’re not nearly done yet! The company just expanded its line of Ultrabooks from two to five. The company also plans to sell so-called Sleekbooks — essentially, thin-and-light laptops that don’t quite meet Intel’s criteria for Ultrabooks. So what goodies to we have in store? First up, there’s the 13.3-inch Envy Spectre XT, whose all-metal body looks nothing like the glass-class clad Envy 14 Spectre we reviewed earlier this year. As with its big brother, the major selling point here is design — in this case, a 3.07-pound machine with a 14.5mm-thick profile. As for specs, you can expect an Ivy Bridge CPU, paired with a 128GB SSD and a battery rated for eight hours of runtime. Like the other Ultrabooks in HP’s stable, it makes room for a USB 3.0 port, HDMI and an Ethernet jack, and similar to other Envys it comes with full copies of Adobe Premiere Elements and Photoshop Elements, along with a two-year subscription to Norton Internet Security. We’re told the warranty on this Envy is one year, not two, but users owners do get a dedicated customer support line, for what that’s worth.

Moving on, HP’s Envy-branded Ultrabooks and “Sleekbooks” will be available in 14- and and 15.6-inch screen sizes in each category, though the Ultrabook configs are naturally Intel-based, while the Sleekbooks will pack Intel or AMD chips. With the Sleekbooks, too, you can also choose optional discrete graphics if there’s an Intel processor inside. (The AMD versions have “discrete-class” graphics, which is really just a nod to the all-inclusive design of AMD’s application processing units.) If you go for the Sleekbook, you’ll also get up to nine hours of battery life;with the Intel-based Ultrabooks, that rating is eight or nine hours, depending on whether you opt for the 14- or 15-inch version. Of course, the Intel-based models are also home to various Intel-branded technologies, including Rapid Start, Identity Protection, Smart Response and Smart Connect.

One thing that won’t change is the industrial design: both the Ultrabooks and Sleekbooks will be offered in black and red. Both Ultrabooks are available today, starting at $750 for the 14-inch model and $800 for the 15-incher. The 14-inch Sleekbook is on sale today, too, starting at $700, though the 15-inch version doesn’t debut until June 20th, at which point it’ll start at $600. As for that Spectre XT, it’ll start at $1,000 and is expected to land June 8th. Until then, we’ve got a mix of photos, along with starting specs after the break.You can already get your hand on the HP ENVY SleekBook and the First Spectre Model at the LFW Shop.

THE PORSCHE 356

LOOKS GOOD, FEELS GOOD and classy, WORKS since 1950!

The Porsche 356, introduced in 1950, put this renowned German automaker on the sports-car map. But even though the 356 was the first Porsche sports car, it was far from the first sporting Porsche.

Ferdinand Porsche was born on September 3, 1875, in the Austrian village of Maffersdor. Turning away from his father’s metalworking business, the young and imaginative Ferdinand pursued a fascination with electricity, and in the 1890s, even designed an electric car. His engineering acumen was obvious, and extended to the design of aircraft engines. After World War I, Porsche began to focus on the subject that would become his life’s passion, a pursuit that began with the design of a small, efficient open-two-seat sporting car, the 1.0-liter Sascha.

Porsche’s career path, however, drew him in the 1920s to the German automaker Daimler, where he helped design powerful 6.0- and 7.0-liter racing engines for expensive Mercedes-Benz classics such as the fabulous SSK. His small-car dreams never died, though, and would find an outlet with his design for an inexpensive air-cooled rear engine car built in the 1930s at the behest of Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler. This was the original Volkswagen, the people’s car. It was known almost from the start by its nickname, the Beetle. World War II derailed the project after but a handful were produced.

Porsche and his design firm, which included his son, Ferry, turned their attention to war production. They would emerge from the conflict battered but intact. VW went on to thrive under its own ownership, while Porsche and his son Ferry returned to that first love and created a small sports car based on the VW Beetle design.

The Porsches had already proved adept at building good sports cars from ordinary components, but it would be left to Ferry to realize the first production Porsche. As he related to CAR magazine’s Steve Cropley in 1984: “During the war I had an opportunity to drive a supercharged VW convertible with about 50 horsepower, which was a lot of power then. I decided that if you could make a machine which was lighter than that, and still had 50 horsepower, then it would be very sporty indeed.”

Ferry and Karl Rabe, an associate from Ferdinand’s days at Daimler, again turned to a VW-based sports car in 1947. Ferdinand had been imprisoned by the French for a brief time after the war on charges relating to his design work for the Third Reich. By the time he rejoined his son and Rabe in August, they had the specifics firmly on paper. Ferry recalls his father being “very interested…of course. He took an interest in everything, but didn’t have the energy anymore…I had to assume the risk myself.”

DESIGNED BY FERDINANDPORSCHE 
DESIGNED IN 1950 
SOURCE HOWSTUFFWORKS